Journal article (OA) / Composting and Rainwater Harvesting as ‘Slow Infrastructure’ in Kerala

Barlow, Matt, and Georgina Drew. ‘Slow Infrastructures in Times of Crisis: Unworking Speed and Convenience’. Postcolonial Studies. Published ahead of print, 16 August 2020.

Abstract (edited): The (post)colonial logics of speed and convenience are manifest in many of today’s infrastructural projects, creating what we consider to be ‘fast infrastructures’. These infrastructures create ease for some and harm for others while exacerbating social and environmental crises around the world. Addressing these crises requires, we argue, a slowing down. Enter the role of ‘slow infrastructures’. In this paper, we highlight two forms of slow infrastructure that provide possibilities for rearranging our infrastructural orientations: composting and rainwater harvesting.

Drawing on fieldwork conducted throughout 2018 and 2019 in Kochi, Kerala, this research asserts that in order to do infrastructure differently, an unworking of convenience and speed is required. This unworking can be achieved through an attunement to multi-species and more-than-human relations, matched with a distributed ethic of maintenance and care. Our ethnographic examples, one from a hospital and another from a hotel, suggest that slow infrastructures can meaningfully offset the threat of disfunction and ‘urban failure’ that confronts cities increasingly marked by turbulence and uncertainty. While these examples draw from the tropics of urban South India, they offer lessons helpful to unworking the harm caused by fast infrastructures in other parts of the globe.

 

Reposted from Kerala Scholars eGroup

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Event / CSI Chennai, ACM Chennai & IEEE CS Chennai – Webinar on “Academic Document Creation Using LaTeX” on 22nd Sept 2020 at 6 p.m. IST

CSI Chennai, ACM Chennai & IEEE CS Madras jointly host webinar on “Academic Document Creation Using LaTeX”.

Speaker: Dr. A. Neela Madheswari, Professor, Dept. of Computer Science and Engineering,
Mahendra Engineering College, Namakkal, Tamilnadu, India.

Date & Time: 22nd September 2020 from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. IST.

Pl register at https://bit.ly/336LoqM

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Journal article / Effect of Employee Desire and Engagement on Organizational Performance

Sabu V.G., and Manoj M. ‘The Effect of Employee Desire and Employee Engagement on Organizational Performance: Evidence from ICT Sector in Kerala, India’. Management and Labour Studies. Published ahead of print, 31 July 2020.

Abstract: This study analyses the multivariate effect of employee desire (ED) and employee engagement (EE) on organisational performance (OP). The data were collected from 352 executive employees belonging to public and private information and communications technology (ICT) sector organisations in Kerala.
The stratified random sampling technique was applied for selecting the samples and the data were collected using a structured questionnaire. The structural equation modeling (SEM) technique was applied to study the causal linkage among the variables.
The analysis revealed that OP is positively influenced by ED and EE. The study further confirms the mediation effect of EE in the relationship between ED and OP. The effects are statistically significant. The study furnishes beneficial inputs for practising managers, which can encourage EE and strengthen OP.

Reposted from Kerala Scholars eGroup

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Kerala Scholars Network / Update 21 – Ala–A Kerala Studies Blog

From
Aparna Vincent, PhD (Co-editor, Ala),
Kalady (Ernakulam District)

Ala’s 24th issue is out now and features two articles:

  • Nivedita Kalarikkal writes on the different factors which influenced the  evolution of Malayalam language.
  • J. Devika writes about the life of Saraswathi Amma, her contributions to feminist literature in early modern Kerala, and the need to translate her works in the context of today’s political climate in Kerala—and indeed—in India.
  • Tracing the history of Kerala’s scientific public sphere, Shiju Sam Varughese writes on the major shift in the nature of public engagement with science with the advent of new media.

Reposted from Kerala Scholars eGroup

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Journal article / Gender and Human Development in Kerala

Shraddha Jain. “Human Development, Gender and Capability Approach”.
Indian Journal of Human Development 14(2), 2020.

Abstract : This article critically reviews Human Development Report (HDR) 2019 that calls for addressing inequalities that are beyond income, beyond averages and beyond today. Inequalities result from differential exposure to opportunities and constraints during a life cycle.

One way in which power relations are exhibited is through gender norms. The article discusses the advancements made in the capability approach using the gender lens and the policy framework intended to address gender inequality. It stresses the need to acknowledge and understand varied forms of data collection that enhance our understanding of underlying social processes.

Finally, it discusses the case of Kerala state to understand the complex nature of human development. The state made strides in education and health, but rising inequalities, gender violence and ecological changes remain major concerns.

More info: https://doi.org/10.1177/0973703020944754

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Journal article / Feminine Subjectivities and Transnational Labour Migration

Anamika Ajay. ‘Differentiation of Femininities in Contemporary Kerala: Evidence from Left-Behind Families of Women Transmigrant Workers’. Migration and Development. Published ahead of print, 23 August 2020.

Abstract: This article explores a largely understudied aspect of women’s transnational labour migration: how localised frameworks of feminine ideals and subjectivities interact with women’s migration. It is based on a mixed-methods field research conducted in 2016 in a village in Central Kerala with a long history of women’s labour migration.

Analyses revealed the emergence of five local categories of feminine subjectivities: the dutiful daughters, young educated and typically unmarried women who are considered as assets rather than burdens by their families; the responsible mothers, who are responsible for the social reproduction of dutiful daughters; the flying grandmas, commonly older mothers who engage in temporary migration to support the transmigrant women with their domestic responsibilities; the defiant wives, mostly married women whose autonomous migration is perceived as a transgression of the conjugal family ideals even though these families survive on their earnings; and the substitute women, typically older women who take over the role of caregivers when married women migrate leaving behind their husbands and children.

The paper concludes by demonstrating how globalising processes like women’s international labour migration interact with localised gender, caste and class structures to produce new and unequal categories of femininities.

More info: https://doi.org/10.1080/21632324.2020.1806604

Reposted from Kerala Scholars eGroup

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Event / CSI Chennai, ACM Chennai & IEEE CS Chennai – Webinar on “Lifetime Employability and Successful Leadership” on 19th Sept 2020 at 6 p.m. IST

CSI Chennai, ACM Chennai & IEEE CS Madras jointly host a Webinar on “Lifetime Employability and Successful Leadership”.

Speaker: Mr Dileep Srinivasan, Founding Partner & CEO of PowerFluence, Author of the book “Achieving Lifetime Employability”.

Date & Time: 19th September 2020 from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. IST

Webinar Flyer at https://bit.ly/3gBWrMx

For details of the presentation and speaker profile, please see the PDF
invite at https://bit.ly/39Zx0SP

Register at https://bit.ly/3kmLzoj

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Journal article / Internal Migration and Wage Inequality in Kerala

Jajati K Parida, Merry Elizabeth John, and Justin Sunny. ‘Construction Labour Migrants and Wage Inequality in Kerala’. Journal of Social and Economic Development, 6 August 2020.

Abstract: This study explores the patterns and determinants of construction-led migration and measures the existing wage differential between migrant and native workers in Kerala using both secondary and primary data.

While secondary data were compiled from Census and NSS migration surveys, primary data were collected from three districts of Kerala using a stratified random sampling method.

It is found that the pattern of internal migration is changing in Kerala with a declining share of migrants from neighbouring states, along with the corresponding upsurge in the inflows from far-off states like West Bengal, Assam and Bihar.

Though poverty and rising unemployment at the place of origin are the pushing factors, relatively higher wages and availability of employment throughout the years are the main pulling factors of in-migration to Kerala.

Since a higher proportion of remittance is spent on basic necessities like food, clothing and housing consumptions, it has a positive implication on poverty reduction at the origin states.

However, it is noted that migrant workers, on the average, earn less than their non-migrant counterparts in Kerala.

Given the importance of these low-skilled migrants in sustaining the long-term economic growth in Kerala, their poor and unhygienic living arrangements should also attract the attention of the policymakers.

More info: https://doi.org/10.1007/s40847-020-00104-2

Reposted from Kerala Scholars eGroup

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Journal article (OA) / Everyday Religiosity among Contemporary Muslims in Kerala

Filippo Osella and Benjamin Soares. ‘Religiosity and its Others: Lived Islam in West Africa and South India’. Social Anthropology 28, no. 2 (2020): 466-81.

Abstract: Drawing on research about settings in South India and West Africa characterised by significant religious diversity, we reflect on the ways in which everyday religiosity among contemporary Muslims is constituted through difference and contestation.

Our cases are from two ostensibly secular states – India and Nigeria – both former British colonies where secularism has been interrogated over the past few decades.

In our focus on what we call ‘lived’ Islam, we pay attention not only to intra‐Muslim differences but also to how religiosity is formed and experienced through engagement and encounters with Others, whether religious, ethnic or political, both locally and globally.

Everyday religiosity in such settings as South India and Nigeria emerges at the interstices of such encounters where Muslims often seek to draw boundaries at the same time as they fashion themselves – in lifestyle, sociality, aesthetics – in relation to various Others.

As we argue, such ethnographic cases with their comparative angle underscore the importance of studying religiosity in heterogeneous settings so as to explode the flawed, idealised sense of wholeness that emerges in some of the literature on the anthropology of one religious tradition or another with such traditions sometimes represented as deriving from self‐contained theologies.

More info and full text: https://doi.org/10.1111/1469-8676.12767

Reposted from Kerala Scholars eGroup

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Writing / Online markdown editors

Ankush Das. “Best online markdown editors”. It’s FOSS, 28 August 2020.

Excerpt : Markdown is a useful lightweight markup language and a lot of people prefer for writing documentation or web publishing. Many of us at It’s FOSS use markdown for writing our articles.

Online markdown editors makes a lot of things easy by providing collaboration features, publishing integration, notes synchronization, and some online-only features.

More info: https://itsfoss.com/online-markdown-editors/

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